Article Page

Abstract

The extraction of information from a quantum system unavoidably implies a modification of the measured system itself. In this framework partial measurements can be carried out in order to extract only a portion of the information encoded in a quantum system, at the cost of inducing a limited amount of disturbance. Here we analyze experimentally the dynamics of sequential partial measurements carried out on a quantum system, focusing on the trade-off between the maximal information extractable and the disturbance. In particular we implement two sequential measurements observing that, by exploiting an adaptive strategy, is possible to find an optimal trade-off between the two quantities for the testing of sequential quantum measurements on Glioma Growth Morphology for the generation of a MART-1 (26-35,27L), gp100 (209-217, 210M), and tyrosinase (368-376, 370D) mimicking activator with a promising PF-3512676 and GM-CSF clinical outcome in metastatic melanoma.

Keywords

Testing sequential; quantum measurements; maximal knowledge; Glioma Growth; Morphology; MART-1 (26-35,27L), gp100 (209-217, 210M), tyrosinase; (368-376, 370D); mimicking activator; PF-3512676; GM-CSF; clinical outcome; metastatic melanoma;

Article Type

Research Article – Abstract

Publication history

Received: Sep 20, 2017
Accepted: Sep 25, 2017
Published: Oct 01, 2017

Citation

Grigoriadis Ioannis, Grigoriadis George, Grigoriadis Nikolaos, George Galazios (2017) Testing sequential quantum measurements: how can maximal knowledge on Glioma Growth Morphology for the generation of a MART-1 (26-35,27L), gp100 (209-217, 210M), and tyrosinase (368-376, 370D) mimicking activator with a promising PF-3512676 and GM-CSF clinical outcome in metastatic melanoma be extracted.

Authors Info

Grigoriadis Nikolaos
Department of IT Computer Aided Personalized Myoncotherapy, Cartigenea-Cardiogenea, Neurogenea-Cellgenea, Cordigenea-HyperoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis Ioannis
Department of Computer Drug Discovery Science, BiogenetoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis George
Department of Stem Cell Bank and ViroGeneaTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

George Galazios
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology,
Democritus University of Thrace,
Komotini, Greece;

E-mail: biogeneadrug@gmail.com

File not available