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Abstract

Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first isolated retrovirus and is the causative agent of Adult T cell leukemia or Tropical Spastic Paraparesis which develops in 6-10 % of HTLV-1 positive individuals. Viral transmission takes place vertically or horizontally via cell to cell contact and syncitia formation between infected and non-infected cells. The viral envelope is responsible for the attachment and entry of the virus into the host cell. Env is composed of two subunits: referred to as the surface subunit, and the gp21 transmembranous subunit. It has been proposed that gp46 is mainly involved in host cell receptor binding and gp21 is involved in post binding events resulting in the fusion of host cell membrane with the infected cell membrane. There has been no effective cure against HTLV-1 and it is resistant to conventional means. We explore the viability of using intrinsically quantum phenomena for molecular sensing. We formulate a theory for coherent sensing by combining the full analytical description of electronic relaxation processes with mass diffusion and charge transport models. This theory produces molecular-scale design criteria for sensors with responses rooted in quantum mechanical coherence phenomena. For example, the sensitivity of the detector can increase with decreased coupling between the molecular binding sites and the sensor substrate. Exploiting quantum properties of the analyte and the sensing element (e.g., electronic affinity, polarizability, etc.) enables enhanced discrimination among multiple analytes. Discovery and a computerized quantitative bio-informatic in silico Development of a Synthetic Gp 46-gp21 derived P400-P197 Peptide mimetic pharmacophore as a potential HTLV-1 Fusion Inhibitor in a mass-action law based new cluster of algorithmsSensing of molecules using quantum dynamics.Therefore investigations in possible therapeutic approaches are very important. One possible therapeutic strategy against HTLV-1 is the use of peptide fusion inhibitors to prevent transmission of the virus. Here, in Biogenea we have for the first time focused on HTVS programs with graphical user interfaces (GUIs) that use either DOCK or AutoDock for the prediction of DockoMatic, PyRx, DockingServer, and MOLA since their utility has been proven by the research community, they are free or affordable, and the programs operate on a range of median-effect equation of the massaction law deduced from over 300 mechanism specific-equations which has been shown to be the unified theory that serves as the common-link for complicated biomedical systems in a computer platform for the in silico discovered Synthetic Peptide mimetic multi-targeted pharmacophore as a novel Potential HTLV-1 Fusion Inhibitor Therapeutics using a mass-action law based algorithm for cost-effective approach for cancer drug discovery and development.

Keywords

Sensing of molecules; quantum dynamics, Discovery, computerized, quantitative bio-informatic, in silico, Development, Synthetic, Gp 46-gp21, derived P400-P197, Peptide mimetic, pharmacophore, HTLV-1, Fusion Inhibitor, mass-action law, new cluster of algorithms.

Article Type

Research Article – Abstract

Publication history

Received: Sep 20, 2017
Accepted: Sep 25, 2017
Published: Oct 01, 2017

Citation

Grigoriadis Ioannis, Grigoriadis George, Grigoriadis Nikolaos, George Galazios (2017) Sensing of molecules using quantum dynamics Discovery and a computerized quantitative bio-informatic in silico Development of a Synthetic Gp 46-gp21 derived P400-P197 Peptide mimetic pharmacophore as a potential HTLV-1 Fusion Inhibitor in a mass-action law based new cluster of algorithms.

Authors Info

Grigoriadis Nikolaos
Department of IT Computer Aided Personalized Myoncotherapy, Cartigenea-Cardiogenea, Neurogenea-Cellgenea, Cordigenea-HyperoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis Ioannis
Department of Computer Drug Discovery Science, BiogenetoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis George
Department of Stem Cell Bank and ViroGeneaTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

George Galazios
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology,
Democritus University of Thrace,
Komotini, Greece;

E-mail: biogeneadrug@gmail.com

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