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Abstract

A stochastic process’ statistical complexity stands out as a fundamental property: the minimum information required to synchronize one process generator to another. How much information is required, though, when synchronizing over a quantum channel? Recent work demonstrated that representing causal similarity as quantum state-indistinguishability provides a quantum advantage. We generalize this to synchronization and offer a sequence of constructions that exploit extended causal structures, finding substantial increase of the quantum advantage. We demonstrate that maximum compression is determined by the process’ cryptic order–a classical, topological property closely allied to Markov order, itself a measure of historical dependence. We introduce an efficient algorithm that computes the quantum advantage and close noting that the advantage comes at a cost–one trades off prediction for generation complexity. The fertilization process includes a cascade of events that the spermatozoon must undergo before fusing with the oocyte plasma membrane. One of the key steps in the fertilization cascade is the recognition and binding between the complementary molecules present on the spermatozoon and zona pellucida (ZP) of the oocyte. In previous scientific reports using the phase peptide display technique, a novel dodecamer sequence, designated as YLP12, was identified that is involved in sperm-ZP recognition/binding. This synthetic 12-mer peptide based on this sequence and its monovalent Fab′ antibodies specifically and significantly (P <0.05) inhibited human sperm-ZP binding. On the basis of the above findings, the present Project was conducted to take the advance of the previous investigated sperm peptide sequence(s) involved in recognition and binding to the complementary molecule of the ZP in humans for the in silico generation of fragment based biosimilars peptidomimetic pharmacophores. Discovering and describing correlation and pattern are critical to progress in the physical sciences. Observing the weather in California last Summer we find a long series of sunny days interrupted only rarely by rain–a pattern now all too familiar to residents. Analogously, a one-dimensional spin system in a magnetic field might have most of its spins “up” with just a few “down”–defects determined by the details of spin coupling and thermal fluctuations. Though nominally the same pattern, the domains of these systems span the macroscopic to the microscopic, the multi-layer to the pure. Despite the gap, can we meaningfully compare these two patterns? To exist on an equal descriptive footing, they must each be abstracted from their physical embodiment by, for example, expressing their generating mechanisms via minimal probabilistic encodings. Measures of unpredictability, memory, and structure then naturally arise as information-theoretic properties of these encodings. Indeed, the fundamental interpretation of (Shannon) information is as a rate of encoding such sequences. This recasts the informational properties as answers to distinct communication problems. For instance, a process’ structure becomes the problem of two observers, Alice and Bob, synchronizing their predictions of the process. However, what if the communication between Alice and Bob is not classical? What if Alice instead sends qubits to Bob–that is, they synchronize over a quantum channel? Does this change the communication requirements? More generally, does quantum communication enhance our understanding of what “pattern” is in the first place? What if the original process is itself quantum? More practically, is the quantum encoding more compact? A provocative answer to the last question appeared recently1,2,3 suggesting that a quantum representation can compress a stochastic process beyond its known classical limits4. In the following, we introduce a new construction for quantum channels that improves and broadens that result to any memoryful stochastic process, is highly computationally efficient, and points toward optimal quantum compression. Importantly, we draw out the connection between quantum compressibility and process cryptic order–a purely classical property that was only recently discovered5. Finally, we discuss the subtle way in which the quantum framing of pattern and structure differs from the classical Occam’s Quantum Strop: Synchronizing and Compressing Classical Cryptic in silico discovery of a novel identified Human testis-specific 12-mer YLP12 Sperm Peptide (SNR12-YLP12YLPVGGLRRIGG) Consensus17GHRGRRVGLGGGGRIGG) Sequence-based chemoanalogues Involved Processes via a Quantum Channel Gamete Genomic Integrity Effect in Immunocontraception.

Keywords

Gamete Genomic; Integrity Effect;in silico discovery;novel identified; Human Sperm; Peptide; Sequence-based; chemoanalogues;Egg Binding;Immunocontraception, Occam’s Quantum Strop; Synchronizing;Compressing; Classical Cryptic Processes; Quantum Channel; Gamete Genomic; Integrity Effect; in silico discovery; Human testis-specific; 12-mer YLP12; Sperm Peptide; (SNR12-YLP12YLPVGGLRRIGG); Consensus;17GHRGRRVGLGGGGRIGG); Svolved in Immunocontraception.

Article Type

Research Article – Abstract

Publication history

Received: Sep 20, 2017
Accepted: Sep 25, 2017
Published: Oct 01, 2017

Citation

Grigoriadis Ioannis, Grigoriadis George, Grigoriadis Nikolaos, George Galazios (2017) Occam’s Quantum Strop: Synchronizing and Compressing Classical Cryptic in silico discovery of a novel identified Human testis-specific 12-mer YLP12 Sperm Peptide (SNR12-YLP12YLPVGGLRRIGG) Consensus17GHRGRRVGLGGGGRIGG) Sequence-based chemoanalogues Involved Processes via a Quantum Channel Gamete Genomic Integrity Effect in Immunocontraception.

Authors Info

Grigoriadis Nikolaos
Department of IT Computer Aided Personalized Myoncotherapy, Cartigenea-Cardiogenea, Neurogenea-Cellgenea, Cordigenea-HyperoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis Ioannis
Department of Computer Drug Discovery Science, BiogenetoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis George
Department of Stem Cell Bank and ViroGeneaTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

George Galazios
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology,
Democritus University of Thrace,
Komotini, Greece;

E-mail: biogeneadrug@gmail.com

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