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Abstract

Thermal conductivity of dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is measured in this study using a transient hot wire technique, where DMSO is a key ingredient in many cryoprotective agent (CPA) cocktails. Characterization of thermal properties of cryoprotective agents is essential to the analysis of cryopreservation processes, either when evaluating experimental data or for the design of new protocols. Also presented are reference measurements of thermal conductivity for pure water ice and glycerol. The thermal conductivity measurement setup is integrated into the experimentation stage of a scanning cryomacroscope apparatus, which facilitates the correlation of measured data with visualization of physical events. Thermal conductivity measurements were conducted for a DMSO concentration range of 2M and 10M, in a temperature range of -180°C and 25°C. Vitrified samples showed decreased thermal conductivity with decreasing temperature, while crystalline samples showed increased thermal conductivity with decreasing temperature. These different behaviors result in up to a tenfold difference in thermal conductivity at -180°C. Such dramatic differences can drastically impact heat transfer during cryopreservation and their quantification is therefore critical to cryobiology. Water solution of Na2SeO3 in polyethylene glycol was utilized as Se source. 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) provides S source. The phosphine-free Se and S sources were found to be highly reactive and suitable for the synthesis of CdSeS nanocrystals. XRD and HRTEM images confirm the formation of CdSeS nanocrystals in zinc blende structure. The absorption peaks on UV-vis spectra of as-prepared CdSeS nanocrystals are tunable from 330 nm to 440 nm, which blue shifts to shorter wavelength side in comparison with that of pure CdSe nanocrystals. The cubic CdSeS nanocrystals demonstrate narrow PL emissions spectra between 464 and 615 nm. Transmission electron microscopy images show the uniformity for the size distribution of the ternary QDs. Series water soluble CdSe1–xSx (x = 0∼1) nanocrystals have also been synthesized using Na2SeO3 and Na2S solution as the Se-S co-sources. Tunable band gap energies of CdSe1–xSx (x = 0∼1) nanocrystals upon chemical composition x have been achieved, the gap ranges from 290 nm to 558 nm. Herein we present an unusual phosphine-free method to fabricate water soluble CdSeS nanocrystals in cubic structure. In this method, glycerin was used as a stabilizing agent replacing tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO). In a continuing effort to develop dosimetric systems that will enable reliable interpretation of dosimeter readings in terms of the absorbed DMSO dose or dose-equivalent, a new multi-element TL dosimeter assembly for the prediction of an optimum dosimetric combination of DMSO, carboxylated ε-poly-L-lysine cryoprotectant agents with minimum Thermal Conductivity Differences between the Crystalline and Vitrified States with Applications to Cryopreservation on Efficient production of live autologous cartilage derived chondrocytes vitrified with optical properties of water soluble CdSeS nanocrystals using glycerin as terminal stabilizing agent.

Article Type

Research Article – Abstract

Publication history

Received: Sep 20, 2017
Accepted: Sep 25, 2017
Published: Oct 01, 2017

Citation

Grigoriadis Ioannis, Grigoriadis George, Grigoriadis Nikolaos, George Galazios (2017) In silico prediction of an optimum dosimetric combination of DMSO, carboxylated ε-poly-L-lysine cryoprotectant agents with minimum Thermal Conductivity Differences between the Crystalline and Vitrified States with Applications to Cryopreservation on Efficient production of live autologous cartilage derived chondrocytes vitrified with optical properties of water soluble CdSeS nanocrystals using glycerin as terminal stabilizing agent.

Authors Info

Grigoriadis Nikolaos
Department of IT Computer Aided Personalized Myoncotherapy, Cartigenea-Cardiogenea, Neurogenea-Cellgenea, Cordigenea-HyperoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis Ioannis
Department of Computer Drug Discovery Science, BiogenetoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis George
Department of Stem Cell Bank and ViroGeneaTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

George Galazios
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology,
Democritus University of Thrace,
Komotini, Greece;

E-mail: biogeneadrug@gmail.com

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