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Abstract

Damage to cartilage causes a loss of type II collagen (Col-II) and glycosaminoglycans (GAG). To restore the original cartilage architecture, cell factors that stimulate Col-II and GAG production are needed. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and transcription factor SOX9are essential for the synthesis of cartilage matrix, chondrocyte proliferation, and phenotype maintenance. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies cannot as yet fabricate new tissue that is indistinguishable from native cartilage with respect to zonal organization, extracellular matrix composition, and mechanical properties. Integration of implants with surrounding native tissues is crucial for long-term stability and enhanced functionality. Bioprinting is a growing field with significant potential for developing engineered tissues with compositional and mechanical properties that recapitulate healthy native tissue. Much of the current research in tissue and organ bioprinting has focused on complex tissues that require vascularization. Cartilage tissue engineering has been successful in developing de novo tissues using homogeneous scaffolds. However, as research moves toward clinical application, engineered cartilage will need to maintain homogeneous nutrient diffusion in larger scaffolds and integrate with surrounding tissues. Bioprinting techniques have provided promising results to address these challenges in cartilage tissue engineering. The purpose of this was to evaluate 3D extrusion-based bioprinting research for developing engineered cartilage. Specifically, we in silico evaluated the Printed cartilage in 3D biopaper had elevated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content comparing to that without biopaper when normalized to DNA. These observations were consistent with gene expression results. This study indicates the importance of direct cartilage repair and promising anatomic cartilage engineering using 3D bioprinting technology impact of 3D bioprinting on nutrient diffusion in larger scaffolds, development of scaffolds with spatial variation in cell distribution or mechanical properties, and cultivation of more complex tissues using multiple materials. Finally, we discuss current limitations and challenges in using 3D bioprinting for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration towards the design of nanofibrous scaffolds for chondrogenesis utilizing a transaxial analysis of the development of a 3D-Printed construct consisting of sox-9 igf-1 Cotransfected human chondrocytes as a hybrid living transplant for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration for the enhancement of the synthesis of cartilage matrix components collagen-II and glycosaminoglycans. A combined experimental measurement for the investigation of articular cartilage and chondrocyte response to collagen ABS/PLA scaffold loading.

Article Type

Research Article – Abstract

Publication history

Received: Sep 20, 2017
Accepted: Sep 25, 2017
Published: Oct 01, 2017

Citation

Grigoriadis Ioannis, Grigoriadis George, Grigoriadis Nikolaos, George Galazios (2017) An in silico combinatorial approach towards the design of nanofibrous scaffolds for chondrogenesis utilizing a transaxial analysis of the development of a 3D-Printed construct consisting of sox-9 igf-1 Cotransfected human chondrocytes as a hybrid living transplant for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration for the enhancement of the synthesis of cartilage matrix components collagen-II and glycosaminoglycans. A combined experimental measurement for the investigation of articular cartilage and chondrocyte response to collagen ABS/PLA scaffold loading.

Authors Info

Grigoriadis Nikolaos
Department of IT Computer Aided Personalized Myoncotherapy, Cartigenea-Cardiogenea, Neurogenea-Cellgenea, Cordigenea-HyperoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis Ioannis
Department of Computer Drug Discovery Science, BiogenetoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis George
Department of Stem Cell Bank and ViroGeneaTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

George Galazios
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology,
Democritus University of Thrace,
Komotini, Greece;

E-mail: biogeneadrug@gmail.com

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