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Abstract

Quantum computers promise to efficiently solve important problems that are intractable on a conventional computer. For quantum systems, where the physical dimension grows exponentially, finding the eigenvalues of certain operators is one such intractable problem and remains a fundamental challenge. The quantum phase estimation algorithm efficiently finds the eigenvalue of a given eigenvector but requires fully coherent evolution. Vitiligo is a skin disorder characterized by selective melanocyte destruction and concomitant appearance of depigmented macules that over time enlarge, coalesce, and form patches. It has been suggested that vitiligo is, at least in part, caused by autoimmune responses mediated by cytotoxic T cells against melanocytes, causing depigmentation Immune responses contribute to the pathogenesis of vitiligo and target melanoma sometimes associated with vitiligo-like depigmentation in some melanoma patients. It has been perviously reported that the tyrosinase autoantigen was immunorecognized with the same molecular pattern by sera from vitiligo and melanoma patients. Five autoantigen peptides was found to compose the immunodominant antityrosinase response: aa95-104FMGFNCGNCK; aa175-182 LFVWMHYY; aa176-190FVWMHYYVSMDALLG; aa222-236IQKLTGDENFTIPYW, and aa233-247IPYWDWRDAEKCDIC. Synergistic therapies for the treatment of vitiligo are provided. The major therapies for the treatment of vitiligo a pigmentary disorder characterized by patchy depigmentation of skin are Psoralens plus UV-A, steroids, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) peptide location or surgical procedures. Psoralens plus UV-A is effective in about 50% of cases, steroids are limitedly effective only in fast spreading cases of vitiligo and often reoccurs on stoppage of treatment. Surgical treatment is the last resort for vitiligo therapy, when all other therapies failed. It is limitedly effective. Basic fibroblast growth factor peptide(s) location was developed as a new mode therapy for the treatment of vitiligo. Therefore, SEQ ID NO: 01 VPHIPPN, SEQ ID NO: 02 MPPTQVS, SEQ ID NO: 03 QMHPWPP, SEQ ID NO: 1 1 LPLTPLP, SEQ ID NO: 12 QLNVNHQARADQ, SEQ ID NO: 13 TSASTRPELHYP, SEQ ID NO: 14 TFLPHQMHPWPP peptides, modified peptides and antibody or antibody fragments inhibiting the activity of MIA and can be used for treating vitiligo by inducing re-pigmentation. Fragment-based lead discovery is a method used for finding lead compounds as part of the drug discovery process. In this science project we perfomed in silico chemoproteomic predictions for the generation of a variational eigenvalue solver on a photonic quantum processor on tyrosinase 95-104FMGFNCGNCK, aa95-104FMGFNCGNCK; aa175-182 LFVWMHYY; aa176-190FVWMHYYVSMDALLG; aa222-236IQKLTGDENFTIPYW, and aa233-247IPYWDWRDAEKCDIC antigenic patterns LFA-3/IgG of a fusion polypeptide IleAlaArgArgPheLeuOH (Kinetensin) mimetic pharmacophore on conserved Vitiligo post-trancripts domains.

Keywords

variational eigenvalue solver; photonic quantum processor; in silico; chemoproteomic prediction-scan; generation; tyrosinase aa95-104FMGFNCGNCK; antigenic pattern;LFA-3/IgG fusion polypeptide; IleAlaArgArgPheLeuOH; (Kinetensin) mimetic; pharmacophore; conserved Vitiligo post-trancripts domains.

Article Type

Research Article – Abstract

Publication history

Received: Sep 20, 2017
Accepted: Sep 25, 2017
Published: Oct 01, 2017

Citation

Grigoriadis Ioannis, Grigoriadis George, Grigoriadis Nikolaos, George Galazios (2017) An in silico chemoproteomic prediction-scan for the generation of a variational eigenvalue solver on a photonic quantum processor on tyrosinase 95-104FMGFNCGNCK antigenic patterns LFA-3/IgG of a fusion polypeptide IleAlaArgArgPheLeuOH (Kinetensin) mimetic pharmacophore on conserved Vitiligo post-trancripts domains.

Authors Info

Grigoriadis Nikolaos
Department of IT Computer Aided Personalized Myoncotherapy, Cartigenea-Cardiogenea, Neurogenea-Cellgenea, Cordigenea-HyperoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis Ioannis
Department of Computer Drug Discovery Science, BiogenetoligandorolTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

Grigoriadis George
Department of Stem Cell Bank and ViroGeneaTM,
Biogenea Pharmaceuticals Ltd,
Thessaloniki, Greece;

George Galazios
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology,
Democritus University of Thrace,
Komotini, Greece;

E-mail: biogeneadrug@gmail.com

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